©2019 by The Operations Guide.

  • Luke Thompson

3 Tips To Introduce New Tools With Your Team

We've all been in a position where we are being forced to adapt to a change in our environment. This is always hard for us as humans because we become comfortable with doing what we know and the routines that follow. It seems safe.


When something comes along and changes up our regular behavior, we naturally fight against it. But the more we unpack and dig into the disruption, we often see larger reasons behind the change that we weren't previously aware of.


To be fair, the traditional top-down "because I said so" approach that is often the driving force inside of the corporate world, doesn't promote any health inside of your #organization and only further adds to the toxicity of your culture. Not to mention it's generally rooted in pride and arrogance... and nobody wants that.


Below are my 3 recommended guidelines to keep in mind when rolling out anything that has the potential to change the way your team operates.


(That even goes for my top 5 recommend free systems for your startup business!)



I want you to communicate with your team... but not like this dude.

1. Clearly Communicate the "Why?"

Are we just doing something new for the sake of it being new? Or will this actually be pulling us closer to achieving our goals as an organization?


Overcommunicate the problems you've been facing and the solutions that you're hoping this implementation will remedy for your team. Do some vision-casting and let them see the larger picture.


Once your team gets to see the end result of how you're hoping this can improve the way they work, they'll be more open to giving honest feedback, because you share the same goal of improving performance and efficiency.




2. Do Your Homework.

At the end of the day, you're the one responsible for the #operations. As such, you need to have researched and made an informed decision on whether this "new thing" will help or hurt your organization.


Not only should you have already explored other alternatives (and have data to back your decision), but if you are moving forward on something specific, you have to know the ins and outs of the bells and whistles it includes. Are there any side-benefits or negative effects we may experience if we proceed with this?


Nearly all software/systems today have free trial periods. Plan accordingly and take advantage of every feature and scenario you can. I would also suggest bringing in some others that will be working closely with the new tool to see if they also see the benefits.




3. Listen to Your Team.

Last but definitely not least: Genuinely hear their thoughts or concerns and answer any questions your team members might have as quickly as possible.


Another major role in the successful implementation of a new #system or tool is the follow-up. Does your team really feel like this new thing has helped them achieve more? Or do they feel like it's become a hindrance to their #efficiency? Listen to what they say and always take their thoughts into account to formulate an informed decision.


Doing this will also continue to build trust within your team since they will see that you're taking their feedback into account. Which, in turn, could also lead to a higher success rate with the new tool or process you're implementing.



Questions to remember before implementing any new tools or systems:

"Is it scaleable?"


"Does it make us more efficient or does it actually inhibit us in areas we can't see yet?"


"Does this help us more efficiently or more effectively achieve our goal(s) of _______?"



I honestly believe that if you use these 3 guidelines to inform your approach to rolling out any new tools, systems, or technologies, your team will thank you and you'll have a higher rate of success than if you went in guns blazin'.


And remember, if it all goes to crap, be humble enough to accept that the new thing you've implemented might not be the best fit for your team at its current stage. If you have to revert or explore alternative solutions, it's not the end of the world!


What successes or failures have you had with implementing new tools with your team? I want to hear about them!